Is forgery a serious criminal offense?

| Jan 13, 2021 | Criminal Defense

Committing a serious criminal offense can result in penalties that may affect the rest of your life. When you are facing allegations of a crime, you may eventually find yourself behind bars, facing expensive fines and other consequences. The stakes are high, even in cases involving crimes that may not seem like they hurt anyone, such as cases involving allegations of white-collar offenses.

White-collar crimes are offenses that involve some type of financial crime, usually committed through some form of deception. One type of white-collar crime is forgery, an offense that often involves making fake documents, passing off stolen work as original or even modifying existing documents without permission. This type of crime may not seem particularly grave, but it is an allegation you should take seriously.

What is it exactly?

The term forgery is often associated with the replication of valuable art for financial gain, but this crime can actually involve much more than stolen art and consumer goods. Consider the following about this type of white-collar crime:

  • Forgery involves any type of imitation of something valuable, falsification of signatures or false documentation.
  • In most criminal cases involving forgery, there must be proof of the intent to commit some type of fraud.
  • It is possible to commit forgery with various different types of documents, including signing another person’s name to a check.

In order for the prosecution to have a valid forgery case against you, they will have to prove you acted in an intentionally deceptive manner. Cases involving identity theft, credit card fraud and other types of crimes committed with the intent of some type of economic gain also frequently involve forgery. Proving intent is the key to successfully charging someone with forgery, and it can be complex for the prosecution to prove this.

Why you need defense help

If you are facing charges of forgery, you could also be facing other related criminal charges as well. Even a seemingly minor white-collar criminal offense could result in penalties that may have a significant impact on your future. You would be wise to approach your situation seriously, starting by reaching out for experienced defense counsel. An assessment of your case with a Massachusetts attorney can help you understand how to protect your rights and fight for your long-term interests.